A new study lends more support to the notion that medical marijuana could help curtail opioid dependency.

The research, published last month in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, found “behavioral economic evidence that cannabis access may modestly reduce demand for opioids in persons who have pain.” The team of researchers used an online survey to assess the frequency and dependency of cannabis and opioid use in adults who were treating pain.

“Adults reporting current use of opioids for pain management and past 30-day cannabis exposure…completed two hypothetical purchase tasks in which only grams of cannabis or units of participants’ index opioids were available for purchase, and two hypothetical tasks in which both were concurrently available and the price of one drug increased whereas the other was kept constant,” they wrote.

They found that demand intensity was “significantly reduced” and that demand elasticity significantly increased for both cannabis and opioids “when the alternate commodity was available, although the reductions in cannabis consumption were more pronounced than they were for opioid consumption in the presence of the alternate commodity.”